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Posts Tagged ‘plugins’

Using Elixir to write RabbitMQ Plugins

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

RabbitMQ is a very extensible message broker, allowing users to extend the server’s functionality by writing plugins. Many of the broker features are even shipped as plugins that come by default with the broker installation: the Management Plugin, or STOMP support, to name just a couple. While that’s pretty cool, the fact that plugins must be written in Erlang is sometimes a challenge. I decided to see if it was possible to write plugins in another language that targeted the Erlang Virtual Machine (EVM), and in this post I’ll share my progress.

Elixir

In the last couple of months I’ve been paying attention to a new programming language called Elixir that targets the EVM, and in the last week it became immensely popular inside the Erlang community (and other circles) since Joe Armstrong, the father of Erlang, tried the language, and liked it very much. So I said, OK, lets give it a try.

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rabbitmq-tracing – a UI for the firehose

Friday, September 9th, 2011

While the firehose is quite a cool feature, I always thought that it was a shame we didn't have a simple GUI to go on top and make it accessible to system administrators. So I wrote one. You can download it here.

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Who are you? Authentication and authorisation in RabbitMQ 2.3.1

Monday, February 7th, 2011

RabbitMQ 2.3.1 introduces a couple of new plugin mechanisms, allowing you much more control over how users authenticate themselves against Rabbit, and how we determine what they are authorised to do. There are three questions of concern here:

  1. How does the client prove its identity over the wire?
  2. Where do users and authentication information (e.g. password hashes) live?
  3. Where does permission information live?

Question 1 is answered in the case of AMQP by SASL - a simple protocol for pluggable authentication mechanisms that is embedded within AMQP (and various other protocols). SASL lets a client and a server negotiate and use an authentication mechanism, without the "outer" protocol having to know any of the details about how authentication works.

SASL offers a number of "mechanisms". Since the beginning, RabbitMQ has supported the PLAIN mechanism, which basically consists of sending a username and password over the wire in plaintext (of course possibly the whole connection might be protected by SSL). It's also supported the variant AMQPLAIN mechanism (which is conceptually identical to PLAIN but slightly easier to implement if you have an AMQP codec lying around). RabbitMQ 2.3.1 adds a plugin system allowing you to add or configure more mechanisms, and we've written an example plugin which implements the SASL EXTERNAL mechanism. (more…)