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rabbitmq-tracing – a UI for the firehose

September 9th, 2011 by Simon MacMullen

While the firehose is quite a cool feature, I always thought that it was a shame we didn't have a simple GUI to go on top and make it accessible to system administrators. So I wrote one. You can download it here.

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RabbitMQ on Heroku

September 1st, 2011 by alexis

We are very pleased to announce the availability in beta of RabbitMQ as a Heroku add-on. With our RabbitMQ service on CloudFoundry, this extends our commitment to supporting the community of cloud application developers.

We believe that cloud messaging is fundamental in two senses. First as a core capability to build applications that scale to cloud use cases – as explained in our blog post launching RabbitMQ on CloudFoundry. And second, because messaging can be extended to solve common problems like integration and data push. For example: to connect traditional on-premise applications with virtualized and cloud deployments.

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SockJS – web messaging ain’t easy

August 22nd, 2011 by Marek Majkowski

The idea of 'realtime web' or messaging using web browsers has been around for quite some time. First it was called 'long-polling', then 'Comet', the latest incarnation is named 'WebSockets'.

Without doubt it's going in a good direction, WebSockets is a neat technology.

But during the fight for realtime capabilities we've lost focus on what is really important – how to actually use messaging. In the web context everything is request-response driven and marrying a typical web stack to asynchronous messaging isn't easy.

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Using the RabbitMQ service on Cloud Foundry with Node.JS

August 16th, 2011 by Michael

Recently we launched a RabbitMQ service for Cloud Foundry, making it simple to spin up a message broker to use with your apps on Cloud Foundry. There are tutorials online for using it with Ruby on Rails and with Java apps using Spring. Here we are going to look at using the RabbitMQ service with Node.JS apps.

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RabbitMQ + Cloud Foundry: Cloud Messaging that Just Works

August 10th, 2011 by David

Today we launched a RabbitMQ service on CloudFoundry.com. This service brings the messaging functionality of RabbitMQ to developers building applications on Cloud Foundry. You can read the main announcement over on the Cloud Foundry blog. There's also an FAQ with more details on the Cloud Foundry knowledge base.  CloudFoundry.com is a free beta service.  So please register there (if you haven't already), then take a look at the RabbitMQ service, try out the sample apps, and write your own.  And tell us how to make it better.

Puka – rethinking AMQP clients

July 8th, 2011 by Marek Majkowski

I fundamentally disagree with the APIs exposed by our current AMQP client libraries.

There is a reason why they’re imperfect: we intentionally avoided innovation in APIs since the beginning. The purpose of our client libraries is to expose generic AMQP, not any one view of messaging. But, in my opinion, trying to map AMQP directly to client libraries APIs is just wrong and results in over-complication and abstractions hard to use.

There is no common ground: the client libraries blindly following AMQP model will be complex; easy to use client libraries must to be opinionated.

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ZeroMQ =/= Erlang

June 30th, 2011 by Michael

Recently I saw a tweet saying "ZeroMQ Erlangizes everything!" or some such. While I realise that not everything posted on the web is meant seriously, it does seem there is a stream of similar claims lately that ought to be dammed.

In the article Multi-threading Magic[1], Pieter Hintjens and Martin Sústrik persuasively explain why concurrency is better served by message-passing than by locks and shared memory. And they are fair, I think, in their analysis -- except for the insinuation that using ZeroMQ transforms your chosen programming language into a domestic Erlang.

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Federation plugin preview release

June 22nd, 2011 by Simon MacMullen

Note: this blog post talks about the federation plugin preview that was released for RabbitMQ 2.5.0. If you're using 2.6.0 or later, federation is part of the main release; get it the same way you would any other plugin.

Another day, another new plugin release :) Today it's federation. If you want to skip this post and just download the plugin, go here. The detailed instructions are here.

The high level goal of federation is to scale out publish / subscribe messaging across WANs and administrative domains.

To do this we introduce the concept of the federation exchange. A federation exchange acts like a normal exchange of a given type (it can emulate the routing logic of any installed exchange type), but also knows how to connect to upstream exchanges (which might in turn themselves be federation exchanges). Read the rest of this entry »

RabbitMQ 2.5.0 released

June 16th, 2011 by Jerry Kuch

The RabbitMQ team is delighted to announce the release of RabbitMQ 2.5.0.

This release fixes a number of bugs. In particular:

  • recovery has been simplified, improving startup times when many exchanges or bindings exist
  • bindings are recovered between durable queues and non-durable exchanges on restart of individual cluster nodes
  • better performance under high load and memory pressure
  • source compatibility with the new Erlang R14B03 release

New features include:

  • tracing facility for debugging incoming and outgoing messages, (see firehose)
  • improved inbound network performance
  • improved routing performance
  • new rabbitmqctl commands ('report', 'environment', and 'cluster_status')

For details see the release notes.

As always, we welcome any questions, bug reports, and other feedback on this release, as well as general suggestions for features and enhancements in future releases. Mail us via the RabbitMQ discussion list, or directly at [email protected].

Can you hear the drums, Erlando?

May 17th, 2011 by Matthew Sackman

Most of us at RabbitMQ HQ have spend time working in a number of functional languages in addition to Erlang, such as Haskell, Scheme, Lisp, OCaml or others. Whilst there is lots to like about Erlang, such as its VM/Emulator, there are inevitably features that we all miss from other languages. In my case, having spent a couple of years working in Haskell before returning to the RabbitMQ fold, all sorts of features are "missing", such as laziness, type classes, additional infix operators, the ability to specify precedence of functions, fewer parenthesis, partial application, more consistent standard libraries and do-notation. That's a fair list, and it'll take me a while to get around to implementing them all in Erlang, but here are two for starters. Read the rest of this entry »